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How To Prevent A Handicap Automatic Door From Closing and Hitting Pedestrians

Everyday automatic swing doors, or low energy handicap doors, are used by all types of pedestrians as a means of entering or exiting a commercial building. But how many times have we seen the door automatically close prematurely. In fact, it is not uncommon to see the door begin to close while a pedestrian in a wheelchair is still in the doorway. Having an automatic door close on someone is very dangerous since the door could knock them over or even smash part of their body. In this article we explain the solution to stop any handicap door opener from closing and hitting somebody.

Warhawk ADA Safety Sensor Is Your Answer

Lucky for you the solution is very simple. The answer is the Warhawk ADA safety sensor. This automatic door sensor uses active infrared technology and background suppression as well as triangulation to detect the presence of a pedestrian. Ultimately, it measures the distance between the pedestrian and the sensor, allowing the sensor to communicate this with the automatic door's control system, preventing the door from closing.



To understand more about how the Warhawk ADA Safety Sensor works, we must first understand what Infrared and Infrared Sensors are.

Understanding Infrared Sensors

What Is An Infrared Sensor?

An infrared sensor is an electronic device that measures infrared radiation. Infrared, or IR, was first discovered in 1800 by a scientist named William Herschell. William discovered that when different colors of light were separated by a prism, the temperature of each color varied. He noticed that the temperature above the color red was the highest. Through his work, we understand that IR, or infrared, is invisible to the human eye because the wavelength is longer than that of visible light. We also understand that anything which emits heat (greater than 5 degrees kelvin) gives off radiation. Thus, leading to infrared sensors which are designed to measure infrared radiation.

Types Of Infrared Sensors

There are two types of infrared sensors, known as active infrared sensors and passive infrared sensors. Both are used for specific applications. The Warhawk ADA safety sensor is an active infrared sensor.

Active Infrared Sensor

An active infrared sensor is is designed to emit and detect infrared radiation. An LED (light emitting diode) emits the infrared radiation, which is sent to the object or pedestrian and reflected back towards the sensor. The receiver detects the signal, allowing the sensor to measure the distance. This type of sensor is sometimes referred to as a proximity sensor.

Passive Infrared Sensor

A passive infrared sensor does not emit any infrared radiation. it is only able to detect infrared radiation coming off of an object. Passive infrared sensors are typically used for home security applications where motion based detection is utilized.

Why The Warhawk ADA Safety Sensor Is The Perfect Solution To Preventing An Automatic Door From Hitting People

The Warhawk ADA safety sensor is designed to mount to the top of the approach side of the door. By mounting to the top of the door, the detection zone is good for a range of 0 to 8 feet. It uses active infrared technology, so when a pedestrian enters into the door way, the Warhawk ADA safety sensor constantly emits an infrared signal which is reflected off of the pedestrian and back to the sensor's receiver. The Warhawk ADA safety sensor is constantly emitting signals and detecting signals to calculate the distance the pedestrian is from the door. This information is processed and sent to the automatic door opener's control box, to keep the door in the full open position. Once the sensor detects the pedestrian has exited the door way, the sensor will communicate to the handicap door opener's controller that it is now safe to close the door. The Warhawk ADA safety sensor has a detection time less than 50 milliseconds allowing for the safest operation and feedback.



The Warhawk ADA Safety sensor is 12/24 VAC/VDC allowing it to be integrated into all automatic door opener makes and models. This sensor is extremely easy to adjust with a tilt feature and side to side adjustment. This sensor can be manufactured for any door size upon request. Standard sensor sizes are available for 36", 42", and 48" ADA doors.

If you need a solution to stop your automatic door from hitting people, then purchase the Warhawk ADA safety sensor. This unit is easy to install and adjust. Order today and receive FREE shipping!





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